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Technologies for the transition to renewables

Technologies for the transition to renewables

Storing, converting, adjusting consumption

Renewable energies have become an important part of the energy mix. According to the International Energy Agency, electricity generation from renewable energies, including hydropower, will triple worldwide between 2012 and 2040. In Brazil, wind power is expected to reach 24 GW of installed power in the national grid by 2024, accounting for 12% of the Brazilian energy matrix. At thyssenkrupp we want to play an important role in the energy revolution.

One of our aims is to make renewable energies a reliable source by developing innovative storage technologies to manage weather-related volatility. Other key areas include our Carbon2Chem project and load management, i.e. adjusting energy consumption to supply.

Carbon2Chem: Turning emissions into raw materials

Carbon2Chem: Turning emissions into raw materials

With our long-term project Carbon2Chem we at thyssenkrupp want to utilize steel mill waste gas as a raw material. The idea is to convert the CO2 contained in waste gases generated during steel production into fuels and fertilizers in nearby chemical plants.

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Redox flow batteries: Storage systems for renewable energies

Redox flow batteries: Storage systems for renewable energies

In the future we will need energy storage systems to keep the power grid in balance. For example, they could store excess electricity produced when it is very windy and then feed it back into the grid when the wind dies down. Redox flow batteries store electricity as chemical energy and have efficiency levels of up to 80 percent.

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Water electrolysis: Power to gas

Water electrolysis: Power to gas

According to a study by the Boston Consulting Group, global demand for energy storage will rise to 330 gigawatts by 2030. In the water electrolysis process, electricity is passed through water and breaks it down into oxygen and hydrogen. Excess electricity can be used for this and converted into a different energy source – hydrogen. The hydrogen can be stored, for example in underground salt caverns, and then converted back into electricity when additional energy is required.

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Cross Energy Management: Consumption follows generation

Cross Energy Management: Consumption follows generation

The sun doesn’t always shine, and the wind doesn’t always blow. The question is whether energy consumption can be organized in line with supply. This is where cross energy management comes in: The idea is for large industrial electricity consumers to adjust their demand for electricity to the supply of renewables.

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